Sample Email Signatures

A lot of the last have been about little things. The subject is my specialty and one of my favorite things to talk about. I’m going to continue with the Little Things, Big Differences theme and talk about email signatures today.

I’ve seen every variation of every possible email signature in the world. That’s a pretty broad statement, but I am 99% sure I have seen pretty much everything one can do with their email signature.

Our hypothetical person today is John Smith. He is the CEO of Company XYZ, which is based at 123 Main Street, Anytown, NY 10011. His office phone number is 800-123-4567. His cell phone number is 123-456-7891. Email is john@companyxyz.com. Fax number is 123-888-4341. John also writes a blog called XYZNews. And of course, his Skype username is johnsmith. People can certainly be contacted a lot of ways.

Here are some examples of various signatures from different people at different companies that I have sitting around my email:

john smith
Company XYZ, CEO
office: 800-123-4567, cell: 123-456-7891

John Smith
CEO
Office – 800-123-4567
Wireless – 123-456-7891
Company XYZ
123 Main Street
Anytown NY 10011

John Smith
Chief Executive Officer
Company XYZ

__________________________________
John Smith
CEO
Company XYZ, Inc.
john@companyxyz.com
XYZNews
Skype: johnsmith


John Smith
CEO, Company XYZ
Work – (800) 123-4567
Cell – (123) 456-7891
Fax – (123) 888-4341

123 Main Street
Anytown, NY
10011

Thanks!

John Smith
Company XYZ

John Smith
Company XYZ
Chief Executive Officer
Office 800.123.4567  Mobile 123.456.7891

Best regards,
John Smith
J
Best,
John
John
Thanks,
John Smith
thanks!
JS
Thanks!
John
JS
John Smith
Company XYZ
— John

Personally, I use:

Best regards,
John Smith

-or-

Best regards,

John Smith
Company XYZ
123-456-7891

There are hundreds more. It’s amazing how something as simple as an email signature can be varied so much. A majority of letter signatures are pretty much the same, but email signatures are very, very different. Most of these signatures aren’t bad – some are. More about which type of email signature is best tomorrow.

In the mean time, post your comments and thoughts. What type of signature do you use?

9 Responses to “Sample Email Signatures”

  1. Glenn Ross said:

    Jun 18, 07 at 3:39 pm

    Where I’ve gotten aggravated is when the person only lists their direct inward dial # in the sig block. I have an urgent question and I call their number only to get trapped in voicemail jail because there’s no way to get to a human.

    Both the sig block and the voicemail message should indicate how to get hold of a human in an emergency. The sig block could contain the main number for the business as well as the DID#.

    Regards,
    Glenn

  2. Service Untitled » The Best Email Signatures - customer service and customer service experience blog said:

    Jun 19, 07 at 2:39 pm

    […] Glenn Ross pointed out that signatures attached to emails that go out to other people shouldn’t include just an inward dial number, but a regular number (as well or instead of). If you are sending an email to someone who you don’t work with, an inward dial number doesn’t do much good. Glenn also suggested that the signature block should include the company’s main number and the voicemail message should let you reach an operator. All good suggestions. An example of a good phone number section would probably be: […]

  3. Six ways to make a good e-mail signature said:

    Jun 21, 07 at 11:37 pm

    […] This post of Doug’s got me thinking… I’ve seen every variation of every possible email signature in the world. That’s a pretty broad statement, but I am 99% sure I have seen pretty much everything one can do with their email signature. Source: Service Untitled » Sample Email Signatures – customer service and customer service experience blog […]

  4. matt said:

    Jun 22, 07 at 6:11 pm

    good , I think.

  5. Marc said:

    Jun 23, 07 at 3:33 pm

    I use the good old usenet convention to begin signatures with two dashes followed by a space on a line of its own (which allows smart UA to strip it on replying) and 4 lines beneath of the form:


    John Smith
    CEO
    John.Smith@company.com
    +1 234 45678

  6. Ankit said:

    Jun 24, 07 at 6:46 pm

    If a business is run out of the home and uses a PO Box for business mailing, should it be included in the signature? I see the signature’s purpose as being a way of identifying how is sending the email and how you can get in touch with them. While you can’t physically meet someone at a PO Box, you could send a letter there.

    I’m not sure if it should be included or not, any thoughts?

    Also, if we use a seperate email address for dealing with clients, such as support@mybusiness.com instead of myname@mybusiness.com, how should it be signed?

    I was thinking that it should be signed like this:

    Regards,
    John Smith
    Company XYZ

    The main issue is that you can’t leave your personal contact information there, because then customers will email/call you personally. Any thoughts you have on these would be appreciated!

  7. Service Untitled said:

    Jun 25, 07 at 2:04 am

    Hi Ankit,

    Good questions!

    I wouldn’t include a PO box in an email signature. I would say it is typically best not to mention that you have a PO box until someone asks where to mail something. They just automatically cause people to be suspicious. It may be worth the money to get a regular street address from The UPS Store or whatever. It just forwards to a PO Box, but you can use a regular address.

    My general rule of thumb is to advise people to have two different email signature templates. One for your personal email and another for your helpdesk type email.

    The personal email signature includes your title, direct telephone number and extension, cell phone number, direct email, etc.

    The helpdesk one says your name and the company you work at. Some companies also like to include their phone number (no direct extension) and a link to their help section. I personally like to include the representative’s personal email, but that is up to you.

    For some reason, I don’t like regards much. The one I find myself using most often is best regards. I’ve seen warm regards and kind regards work nicely as well. However, I just don’t seem to like regards by itself.

    Thanks for the great questions!

  8. Kiran said:

    Aug 03, 09 at 10:53 am

    Is it a must for the signature to be in italics?

  9. Melbourne Shop Fronts said:

    Mar 28, 11 at 1:02 pm

    An email signature really varies. I agree that some are good and some are bad. I just found out that there is an Online Personal Signature Maker. You may want to check that out guys.